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Home » Results--Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) » Citations from Ophthalmology

Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES)

Citations from Ophthalmology

Rohit Varma MD, MPH, Sylvia H. Paz MS, Stanley P. Azen PhD, Ronald Klein MD, MPH, Denise Globe PhD, Mina Torres MS, Chrisandra Shufelt MS, Susan Preston-Martin PhD and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
Los Angeles Latino Eye: Disease Study, Design, Methods, and Baseline Data
Ophthalmology. 2004;111:1121-1131
Conclusion: The LALES has recruited Latinos 40 and older for an ophthalmic epidemiologic study. The LALES cohort will provide information about the prevalence and risk factors of ocular disease in the largest and fastest growing minority in the United States.

Rohit Varma MD, MPH, Mei Ying-Lai MS, Ronald Klein MD, MPH, Stanley P. Azen PhD and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
Prevalence and risk indicators of visual impairment and blindness in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study
Ophthalmology 2004;111:1132-1140
Conclusion: Rates of visual impairment and blindness in Latinos are high, especially in older individuals. Better education and employment are likely to decrease the burden of visual impairment in Latinos.

Denise R. Globe PhD, Joanne Wu MS, Stanley P. Azen PhD, Rohit Varma MD, MPH and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
The impact of visual impairment on self-reported visual functioning in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study
Ophthalmology2004;111:1141-1149 Conclusion: In this population-based study of Latinos, the NEI Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25) was sensitive to differences in visual acuity (VA). A 5-point difference on the NEI-VFQ-25 seems to be a minimal criterion for a visual impairment-related difference. Self-reported visual function is essentially unchanged if the definition of visual impairment includes or excludes a VA of 20/40.

Rohit Varma MD, MPH, Samantha Fraser-Bell BSc(Med), MBBS, Sylvia Tan MS, Ronald Klein MD, MPH, Stanley P. Azen PhD and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Disease Study
Ophthalmology. 2004;111:1288-1297
Conclusion: Detailed population-based estimates of AMD in Latinos are provided. Despite relatively high rates of early AMD, corresponding rates of advanced AMD are not high. Data on progression of the high rates of early AMD in Latinos require further study.

Rohit Varma MD, MPH, Mina Torres MS, Fernando Peņa MD, Ronald Klein MD, MPH, Stanley P. Azen PhD and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in adult Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study
Ophthalmology 2004;111:1298-1306
Conclusions: Our data suggest that the prevalence of DR is high among Latinos of primarily Mexican ancestry. The increase in prevalence of DR with longer duration of diabetes emphasizes the public health importance of early diagnosis and management in Latinos. Further data on incidence and progression are required to understand better the natural history of DR in Latinos.

Rohit Varma MD, MPH, Mei Ying-Lai MS, Brian A. Francis MD, Betsy Bao-Thu Nguyen MD, Jennifer Deneen MPH, M. Roy Wilson MD, Stanley P. Azen PhD and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
Prevalence of open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study
Ophthalmology 2004;111:1439-1448
Conclusion: Our data suggest that the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is high among Latinos of Mexican ancestry. The higher prevalence of OAG in older Latinos emphasizes the public health importance of providing eye care services for the early diagnosis and management of this condition in Latinos.

Rohit Varma MD, MPH, Mina Torres MS and Los Angeles Latino Eye Study Group
Prevalence of lens opacities in Latinos: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study
Ophthalmology 2004; 111:1449-1456
Conclusion: Our data provide the first population-based estimates of the prevalence and severity of lens opacities in Latinos. Cortical opacities were the most common type. The high rate of visual impairment from lens opacities suggests that programs that increase access to cataract surgery for older Latinos could help to reduce the burden of visual impairment in the United States.



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